PowerCLI in the vSphere Web Client – PowerActions

PowerActions integrates the vSphere Web Client and PowerCLI to provide complex automation solutions from within the standard vSphere management client.

PowerActions is deployed as a plugin for the vSphere Web Client and will allow you to execute PowerCLI commands and scripts in a vSphere Web Client integrated Powershell console.

Furthermore, administrators will be able to enhance the native WebClient capabilities with actions and reports backed by PowerCLI scripts persisted on the vSphere Web Client. Have you ever wanted to “Right Click” an object in the web client and run a PowerCLI script? Now you can!

For example I as an Administrator will be able to define a new action for the VM objects presented in the Web client, describe/back this action with a PowerCLI script, save it in a script repository within the Web client and later re-use the newly defined action straight from the VM object context (right click) menu.

Or, I as an Administrator can create a PowerCLI script that reports all VMs within a Data Center that have snapshots over 30 days old, save it in a script repository within the Web client and later execute this report straight from the Datacenter object context menu.

Or better yet, why not share your pre-written scripts with the rest of the vSphere admins in your environment by simply adjusting them to the correct format and adding them to the shared script folder.

For additional information see the video in the Video tab, or read this article.

PowerAction

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NSX Design Guide v2.1

This is a second and completely reworked edition of the VMware® NSX for vSphere Network Virtualization Design Guide

Authors: Max Ardica and Nimish Desai

This document is targeted toward virtualization and network architects interested in deploying VMware® NSX Network virtualization solution in a vSphere environment.

In this edition the guide was completely reorganized, grouping content in three sections, respectively covering:

1. NSX-v functional components

2. Functional services

3. Design considerations.

https://communities.vmware.com/docs/DOC-27683?sf31303715=1

 

Certification VMware Certified Professional – Network Virtualization (VCP-NV) – released

VCP-NV

The VCP-NV certification validates your ability to install, configure, and administer NSX virtual networking implementations, regardless of the underlying physical architecture. With the knowledge validated by the VCP-NV certification, you will be prepared to install and administer architectures ranging from basic to advanced implementations.

Successful candidates will demonstrate core networking skills, such as:

Layer 2 switching and both static and dynamic Layer 3 routing
integration with virtual standard and distributed switches
management of networking policies for performance, scalability, and ease of administration
creating and administering NSX logical switches, Layer 2 bridges, routers, load balancers, VPNs, firewalls
creating and administering Edge services, such as DHCP, DNS, and NAT, configuring and managing High Availability
operational tasks, such as user permissions and roles, automation, monitoring, logging, auditing and compliance, backup and recovery
troubleshooting an Enterprise-class NSX networking implementation

http://mylearn.vmware.com/mgrReg/plan.cfm?plan=51111&ui=www_cert

VMware Virtual SAN Sizing Tool

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The purpose of this tool is to help determine the hardware specifications for hosts in a Virtual SAN cluster required to run a set of virtual machines defined by a set of input characteristics. These important assumptions should be understood before using this tool:
  • All hosts in the cluster are assumed to have an identical hardware profile, i.e. numbers of hard drives and flash devices, amount of physical RAM, and number of CPU cores
  • All virtual machines are assumed to be identical in storage characteristics, i.e. number of VMDKs, size of VMDKs (assumed identical for all disks), number of snapshots, and virtual memory size
  • All virtual machines are assumed to have the same Virtual SAN policy, i.e. number of failures to tolerate and number of disk stripes per object

The tool is designed so that you can easily vary inputs to see the impact on the sizing output, thus allowing you to iterate manually for more sophisticated analyses.

VMware Virtual SAN Sizing Tool 

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